Hot Gas

Music,Musings et al

Month: September, 2012

Ishkq in Paris (Sajid Wajid)

I am usually loath to write anything about Sajid Wajid’s work because, let’s face it, there is nothing much to write about. If Salman Khan’s movies are critic proof, so is Sajid Wajid’s music. If memory serves me right they even won an award for Dabanng. Talk about travesty. The only good song to have emerged from this duo’s efforts till date is Caravan from the ill fated Hello. But whenever they have dabbled in melody, they have come up with some interesting results. Jaane Bhi De from this album is one of those. The tune is middle of the road; hummable but lightweight. But the composers are ingenious enough to prop it up with that relentless strumming which gives the song its much needed flesh and character. Sonu Nigam is also a nice choice. The duo almost get it right with Rahat’s Saiyaan also; the inventive mukhda is a triumph but everything else is pretty much clichéd just like the rest of this album.

Tape (Richard Linklater)

Tape is a terrific, smartly textured movie. Linklater just churns out these little gems, one after the other. The movie has shades of McEwan’s lurking unease and constantly escalating tension as a conversation between three high school friends (now adults) progresses. Much of the conversation revolves around an incident from the past that involved the three of them. It takes place in a dingy hotel room giving the movie an oppressive charge but the best thing about the movie is how the characters talk so much but convey so little; leaving much to the interpretation of the viewer. The performances are stunning; Ethan Hawke is always great; Robert Sean Leonard is excellent (Funny how these two also acted in the polar opposite Dead Poets Society) and so is Uma Thurman who takes a while to get into the groove. This is psychological violence at its best. Bravo Linklater!

Tape (Richard Linklater)

Tape is a terrific, smartly textured movie. Linklater just churns out these little gems, one after the other. The movie has shades of McEwan’s lurking unease and constantly escalating tension as a conversation between three high school friends (now adults) progresses. Much of the conversation revolves around an incident from the past that involved the three of them. It takes place in a dingy hotel room giving the movie an oppressive charge but the best thing about the movie is how the characters talk so much but convey so little; leaving much to the interpretation of the viewer. The performances are stunning; Ethan Hawke is always great; Robert Sean Leonard is excellent (Funny how these two also acted in the polar opposite Dead Poets Society) and so is Uma Thurman who takes a while to get into the groove. This is psychological violence at its best. Bravo Linklater!

Student of the Year (Vishal Shekhar)

The original hook of Biddu’s Disco Deewane carries the remix through, which for a while threatens to be all bluster and empty pop sound, and it is still Nazia Hassan’s vocals that stand out. The Shahid Mallya sung Kukkad is straight out of the Salim Sulaiman assembly line. Despite the incongruence between tune and lyrics Ratta Maar is decent. Radha has a moth eaten tune which for some reason reminded me of Rahman’s Jhootha Hi Sahi. Shekhar helms the Punju Vele well but, again, this is no great shakes. The duo, however, hit back with Ishq Wala Love; a soft, dulcet melody with great lyrics (and interesting use of tabla!) that is in the same bracket as the duo’s earlier songs Tooti Phooti and Barish Ki Boondein. Mashup of the Year (I see what you did there) rounds of the album on a pulsating note and makes the job of all the DJs out there so much easier. 

SOTY is a passable soundtrack from the duo who do as much as they can to make the music, that is supposed to be sung by college kids, interesting.